Using Build it Beta to Test and Deploy your Windows Phone Applications

Using Build it Beta to Test and Deploy your Windows Phone Applications

Over the last year we’ve been working on Build it Beta to assist Windows Phone developers deploy and test their applications. To get started, follow the setup instructions for Build it Beta

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Here’s a bit more information on each step:

Step 1: The Build it Beta application is available in both the Windows and Windows Phone Stores. In order to test an application on your Windows Phone device, the first step is to download the Build it Beta application from the store.

Step 2: After downloading and installing Build it Beta you then need to run and sign into Build it Beta. You can choose between one of the supported social network providers (Facebook, Twitter, Microsoft, Google) and use an existing or create a new set of credentials. You need to supply a valid email address so that we can identify your account. When you want to test and application you can simply send your application to upload @ builditbeta.com from the email address you entered. We’ll send you a confirmation after the application is available for testing. After signing in, you should be prompted to return to the setup instructions. Alternatively press and hold the back button and switch back to Internet Explorer where you should still have the setup instructions.

Step 3: Install the Built to Roam enterprise deployment certificate. This certificate is required in order to install applications you want to test. Rather than deploying applications via the Windows Phone store, where they’re signed with a pre-trusted certificate, in Build it Beta all applications are currently signed using the Built to Roam enterprise deployment certificate. Installing this certificate won’t affect your ability to install applications from the Windows Phone store, nor does it affect any other enterprise enrolment you may have (eg via an MDM provider).

Step 4: Install the Build it Beta Installer. Due to both technical and policy limitations on applications installed from the Windows Phone Store, Build it Beta relies on a secondary application to install the applications you want to test. Clicking the link in the setup instructions should prompt you to install this application. Unfortunately there isn’t a progress indicator or confirmation that it has been installed successfully – give this step a minute or two before moving on.

Step 5: Launch the Build it Beta Installer. This will run the installer and pair it with the main Build it Beta application. Once you’ve completed this process you’re good to go – start sending your applications to Build it Beta to test them.

 

Testing an application

When you have an application that you want to test you can send it to Build it Beta a number of ways:

Email – Simply email your xap or appx file to upload @ builditbeta.com. You’ll get a confirmation message back once the application has been ingested.

Upload – If you have Build it Beta for Windows installed you can simply double-click your xap file. The application will be uploaded to Build it Beta.

Attachment – Rename your xap file to .betaxap and email it to someone you want to test your application. Clicking the attachment will upload the application via Build it Beta for Windows Phone and make it available for the tester.

The Danger of Setting CacheMode to BitmapCache on Windows 8

The Danger of Setting CacheMode to BitmapCache on Windows 8

This week has been full of interesting challenges as we worked to release another Windows 8 application for a client. Credit must go to the client who has set the expectation bar at an incredibly high level – I truly wish all clients had this level of respect for their brand, identity, apps, website etc. One of the challenges we came up against was with a very persistent image that refused to display correctly. By correctly I mean without any distortion, blurring, pixelation etc that happens when you incorrectly resize images. Now we only really saw this on the Surface 2 which runs at a scale factor of 140 and it was clearly evident that the image that was displayed was blurry. Following all the documentation and guidance we provided images at 100, 140 and 180 scale factors and validated that the correct image was being show by tagging each image to make them slightly unique. We also ensured that the image element was the correct size for the image and that Stretch was set to None (interesting side note – it appears that even if the element size matches the image size, if you leave Stretch to its default value of Uniform you end up with some visual distortion).

Even after doing all of that we still ended up with an image that was slightly blurry – enough that you’d have thought the image had been blown up slightly. It turns out that we had set CacheMode=BitmapCache on a parent element to ensure that when we animated the elements they would animate together. Removing the CacheMode attribute resulted in the image appearing crystal clear.

Ok, so here’s the original.

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Here’s an image where the left side is taken from an element with CacheMode=BitmapCache, the right side is from an element without this attribute – spot the difference (hint, look at the edge of the spiral towards the centre)

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Here’s an image where the top is taken from an element with CacheMode=BitmapCache, the bottom side is from an element without this attribute – again you should be able to see the difference.

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Call out to mobile developers out there – do you care this much about your apps? If not, then you need to re-evaluate your quality bar.